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very easily. >>> author of numerous books on abraham lincoln recalls the four months between president lincoln's election and a number of 1860 to his inauguration in march, 1861. during this time the president was pressured by republicans and democrats throughout the country to maintain the union. it's a little over an hour. >> welcome to the virtual book signing here at the abraham lincoln bookshop as always. i'm daniel weinberg and i am pleased to have you here. it is a lincoln civil war book signing at work. it's a wonderful way for you to build a first edition signed library with all of the books coming out over the next few years in the lincoln bicentennial which is upon us but also the war that follows the heels there are so many books coming out and we are going to try to weed through them and have the authors on the show so you can see the best research going and also you have to weed out others that you don't have to have always. there are too many books out there. >> i say that as a book dealer we adjust them for book signings and that is what distinguishes us. if you are wat
penceble to preserve it. this approach was dictated in lincoln's mind by two assumptions. first lincoln assume that the national government must at all costs remain support of the four slave states within the union. those in light blue. so called loyal border states, delaware, missouri, maryland and especially kentucky top do that, he believed, the republicans must not an antagonize those states politically powerful slave holders. antagonize them by interfering with slavery in the succeeding states at least not interfering with them anymore than necessary. lincoln was sure that if he did otherwise the slave holders would pick up and leave as well. second lincoln assumes that only a small minority in the succeeding states really support succession. he and other republicans believe that the great majority of white southerners in the confederacy. slave holders and nonslave holders alike. loyal abiding citizens who had been tricked in to suck us is suggestion by a minority of extremists. leaving slavery alone would hopefully, win them back in to the union. that is the expectations. but afte
lincoln noted in the his first inaugural address that, quote: one section of our country believes slavery is right and ought to be extended while the other believes it is wrong b and ought to be extended -- sorry, and ought not to be extended, and this is the only substantial dispute, period. closed quote. the president of the confederate states of america, jefferson davis, reminded his congress in 1861 these are his words: the labor of african slaves was and is indispensable to our prosperity so that with interests of such overwhelming magnitude imperilled by the election to the presidency of an anti-slavery man by abraham lincoln, he meant, the people of the southern states were driven to the adoption of some course of action to avert the danger with which they were openly menaced. and that course of action, of course, was leaving the federal union. davis was not overstating the stakes for him if his fellow -- for him and his fellow slave owners, the more than 12 million souls who resided in the southern states in 1860. nearly one out of three of those people was enslaved, was owned out
historians have spent years poring through the letters and evidence for this book on lincoln or the hundreds on washington. so my thought was eureka, why not look at the person and ask him the first lady because historians have largely ignored the role of the first lady has these words he had ruled a trade ignoring mistresses in shaping the man. i suspect a lot of my colleagues tend to be older man, educated in a certainly they didn't do any such matters manchester is that they are not dedicated under educated matters of the heart. by studying the first lady, for example the first and thomas jefferson did, after spending 13 days and it lost outside of philadelphia bred in the declaration of independence, he went shopping for his wife. he mr. she was preggers. she had a miscarriage and game mastering batterson gloves. then he begged off from serving the rest of the summer so he could go home to monticello to be with his wife. every winter of the revolutionary war, right there besides george washington, suffering through the freezing weather was martha washington with her white on at cannes. s
on the first lady's. the body of knowledge on lincoln pretty much everything that could be written probably has been. the greatest historian says been years poring through the letters and the evidence to produce this book on lincoln of this book and the hundreds of books on washington. so my problem is, why not look at the person that new them the best, the first lady because historians have largely ignored the role of the first lady as the largely ignored the mistresses and shipping the man. tend to be older man, educated in a certain way. most historians, as i always say, were not educated in matters of the heart. studying the first lady, the first thing thomas jefferson did after spending 17 days cooped up in of lost outside a philadelphia writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did is he went shopping for market, his wife. he mr. she was pregnant. she had had a miscarriage. he bought her some gloves. then he begged off from serving for the rest of the summer so he could go home to be with his wife. every winter of the revolutionary war. suffering through the freezing wea
by chance. when lincoln creates -- lincoln creates some really great was but one of the first words he thought about secession. he said that secession is the sugar coating, the impact of this country. lincoln when he first used sugarcoated, the printers of the united states comes to lincoln and said we cannot put this in the official record, the word sugarcoated. and lincoln says i can't imagine any american not knowing what you're saying. lincoln was also, again i'm going back to william safire's influence, one of the first uses of cool, not innocent of temperature but in the sense of being callous, he said, something he said that was cool. that was callous. it was a behavioral thing. so again, those are, a word like cool. obama could come up with a new name of cool. that's another thing. one word and you give it different many. as i said with all these different meanings. and how i did this was i did a lot of reading and i get a lot of use of huge proprietary databases at the library of congress. 19th century database where you can find the original document in which 1807 when jeffer
20 years, it probably isn't. it may happen by chance. when lincoln creates a really interesting words, one of the words he first uses he's talking about secession. he said the secessionist sugarcoating the impact on this country. the printer of the united states comes to lincoln and says we cannot put this in the official record. lincoln said i can't imagine any american not knowing. again, going back to william safire's influence on his, one of the first uses of cool, not in the sensor temperature, but the sense of being callous coming he said that was cool. i was a behavioral thing. so again, obama could come up with a new meaning of cool. one word and you give. how i did this quiz i did a lot of reading and i did a lot of use of huge proprietary databases at the library on price. nineteenth century databases for you can find the original document in which 1807, when jefferson raised to danbury baptists and comes up with this race and the separation of church and state, which is not in the dictation. first articulated in this letter to danbury baptists preach everything. a lot of it
. when lincoln creates lincoln is a talking about secession. he said you are sugarcoating the picture of this country. the printers that we cannot put this in the official record. and he said i can't imagine no american not knowing what sugarcoating men's. this goes back to william safire's influence. one of the first uses of cool, not in a sense the sense of temperature but in the sense of being callous, he said that was a behavioral thing. those are words, words like cool. obama could come up with a new meaning for it as well. he could take his own word and given a new meaning. how either this was i did a lot of reading and i did a lot of use of huge proprietary databases that the libraries tab. nineteenth century databases where we can actually find the original document in which jefferson writes to the danbury caucus and comes up with a phrase of separation of church and state, which is not in the constitution. in fact it was first articulated in this letter by jefferson. so there were these big huge data proprietary bases where there is about every word and phrase. mckinley came
discrimination a crime. it was a very, very -- probably the most important advance since lincoln signed the emancipation proclaimation, and during that year, if johnson was mr. inside, and some outside, because he gave some inspirational speeches -- king kept the pressure on. whenever he thought that the congress was going to falter, that they couldn't beat a southern filibuster, king went to jail, and he refused to let people forget what this was all about. i'd like to concentrate on one particular period, because we have an anniversary coming up today, and i think looking at johnson and king during the struggle over the voting rights act in 1965, illustrates as well as anything the brilliance of both these men, the difficulty of their task, and their multidimensional leadership. the most important aspect of -- one of the most important aspects of which was the uncanny ability of both johnson and king to seize opportunity. they knew when to strike. on january 15, 1965, president johnson called martin luther king to congratulate him on his 36th birthday. listen to a little bit of what t
and bill clinton. lincoln as its successful -- special case and that his second term was so brief. the it is interesting to note that only the president who had a more successful second term than their first was james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the presidents elected to a second term, and the reasons for those that have experienced failed or troubled second terms. for failed because of a war that seemed unwinnable, or for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the four. also, for failed because of economic crisis for failure to act to deter such a crisis. these were jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt from the 37 downturn, and george bush. at failed due to their inability to lead congress were jefferson, monroe, grants, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. to failed due to hubris, franklin roosevelt, and richard nixon are the four who did not effectively communicate their agendas or initiatives were jefferson, monroe, grant in cleveland. obviously, the dominant source of failure for second term president
and continue to move ahead with courage really influenced her. then she went on to a school called lincoln school that produced a lot of socially active leaders in our nation. missionaries came and educated children to become more socially minded, to think about the world they lived in. that began the early activism inherent piqued her interest in why am i here and what is my purpose? from that point down she was purpose-driven in by the time she got to antioch she became involved in the naacp the progressive political party in the peace movement. she was involved in the police movement well in advance of daddy speaking out on the war in vietnam. >> host: this public image of your mother is behind-the-scenes, quiet. >> she was a quiet storm. [laughter] >> host: what was she like as a person? >> guest: she was very issue driven. she had a gentle spirit and the thing that i like to say about her the most is she exuded the unconditional love of god like nobody ever knew. i didn't know my father's will because i was only five when he was assassinated. she satel mail the time i don't hold grudg
-- was a terrible -- he's kind of like lincoln in a way -- are you for slavery or are you not? because he's trying to keep the border states in line. he was terrified that if he ceded the black delegation that the white democrats from kentucky and tennessee and the other border states would walk out, and that's what -- he was pretending that he didn't have anything to do with it, but he was consumed by no other issue, and putting that together is an amazing story -- or chapter, i think, in our american history about the sensitivity of this issue at this time. c-span: but when he came up to the white house, he didn't have a meeting scheduled with lyndon johnson and he was supposed to meet with hubert humphrey. >> guest: right. c-span: and there was a lot of maneuvering around. >> guest: i'm sorry. you're talking about -- this is at selma. this is at sali in february of 1965. dr. king can out of jail in sali and announced in depression, he came out of jail and his aides said you can't just come out of jail. you have to have a purpose for coming out of jail. and he said i'm tired. i'm depressed. i've
in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial. ok. the book starts out and it has a picture of me. now when i wrote this book, i envisioned that i would be reading to children just like you, and the reason i thought of that is because my grandmother and my aunt lived in the home with us and many times they would baby-sit for my mother and father and they would sit and read to us and engage us in conversation. so i thought that this book would be like a grand conversation. i'm going to read some things to you. and so often children and even adults don't think about dr. king as a normal boy who did the same things that you do. you like to play, right? and so did he. all right. now i'm going to read some of the things to you. i start out by saying, gather around and listen, just like you are gathered around me, as i share childhood memories of my brother, the reverend dr. martin luther king jr. i am his older sister and i have known him longer than anyone else around. i knew him long before the speeches he gave and the marches he led and the prizes he won. i even knew him before he dreamed the d
meeting george washington in his underpants or abraham lincoln. at least for my students at rutgers university, martin luther king, that is really the past back there with washington and lincoln or something, all of american history before they were born is ancient history to them. there he is in white boxer shorts and i go in and we americans are in formal. he was taking a nap which i understood perfectly. i began to talk to him about we have got to do something about the media because if i found you they will find you and drive you crazy and you want to take it easy today. i want to help you take it easy today. and here is what i recommend. i recommend that i let the press attache set up a press conference of only half an hour in the ballroom of the hotel limited to half an hour. i will do the interpreting and he will set it up for an hour from now. i understand you are just here to see the town but if we don't do that, the paparrazzi will drive us crazy so if we don't do this and say it is limited to that, and he said okay so i called the embassy and he set it up. later on it was
or two might sick wasn't lincoln in the 19th century? and then she says, can you name an american literary figure. all hands raise, and they say mark twain. and so who has the bigger impact in the world? is it a literary figure or is it a political figure? very interesting. we think politics as a society often, when really literature is the power driving figured. >> [inaudible] is advertising. i have always resisted putting advertising in the random house books. whether it be for real pharmaceutical, and yet when you take something like ian fleming novels, james bond, we all know what champagne he drinks are what car to drive. the aston martin, of course you know. the aston martin. that's a famous british racing car. that's in the book, but if i -- if i offered aston martin advertisement when i published james bond, ian fleming is to work on my newspaper. what's wrong with it? spent i don't think when the agents round advertising from -- it was mass-market paperbacks, and you can find them in bookstores that still have merit cigarettes in the back, and there was impact, which defe
, it was hard for a manhattan lincoln recall -- liberal to say that rusher is a hick and this and that. you can't sigh that about buckley and you couldn't say it about rusher. so rusher reinforced that thought that they're smart, sophisticated people, fun to have around if you can stand their viewpoint now and. the rusher was another example of that kind of conservative. younger conservatives tended to admire that, and he tried to bring them along in that style and vein. also as dr. edwards referred to, rusher was a major, major conservative debater for quite a while. most prom lent through on a pbs show called "the advocates." he was the conservative advocate. it was debate show. he did extremely well and a lot of people would watch that and say, well, we can do that, too. we can be as good as he is. i have not really had time to go much into this mentoring role with young conservatives, but he loved to advise them. he liked hearing about what they were doing, if they were doing something. it was very important to do things. rusher didn't like people who just sat around and talk. or didn't rea
when the crowd that had massed at the washington monument was walking up to the lincoln memorial to hear dr. king's speech and the speeches by others. >> host: we're speaking with jim wallace, photographer, and he has put together this book, "courage of the moment. the civil rights struggle 1961-1964." thanks so much. >> guest: thank you. >> here's a look at some books that are being published this week. >> look or for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. >> if you want to convert people, you've got to, first of all, persuade them that their soul is in dire danger, headed for the ultimate bonfire on the other side of existence. and for that you need to label them follow orers of the definitely -- followers of the devil, satan. diabolical human beings. so they look for the devil and look among the deities, a very complex religion. very elaborate, very well structured, and they looked among the deities, and they found be issue, the deity called issue. who's issue? i often refer to issue as the imminent --
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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